And in the end–Henderson has scored for Canada

Posted: September 29, 2012 in Uncategorized
We now bring you to the thrilling conclusion of
 
1992 Future Trends Team Canada

 
# 91 Dionne
 
Marcel Dionne had just come off of his rookie season in the National Hockey League as the 1972 Team Canada training camp began, and many, including himself, were surprised by his inclusion on Team Canada ’72.
Dionne never did make an appearance in the tournament, but he quietly enjoyed his time.
 

 
# 92 Lapointe
 
Guy Lapointe was one of the young defensemen on Team Canada that ended up impressing everyone tremendously.


Lapointe almost declined his invitation to Team Canada. His first wife was due to give birth to their first child that September. But Guy did go and just missed the birth of his son.

 

 
# 93 Johnston
 

 With Gerry Cheevers not getting an invite to Team Canada because of his jump to the World Hockey Association, Eddie Johnston was the third goalie on the team.

# 94 Sinden

Sinden was one of the few who knew the job would not be easy. While the media was predicting an 8 game Canadian sweep, Sinden was cautious in his optimism. He would always deflect premature praise for his team. He knew his opponents were stronger than his players and his nation was giving them credit for, but it wouldn’t be until after the shocking loss in game one that he would get their full attention.

 
# 95 Park
 
Park, who was 24 years old in 1972, credits playing in the tournament as making him a better player as he embarked upon his Hall of Fame career. Playing and practicing with so many great NHL stars at the time, plus incorporating a few tricks from the new school Soviet game plan helped Park tremendously
 
 

 
# 96 T.Esposito
 
Tony Esposito was supposed to be the backup in this tournament. It is certainly arguable that “Tony O” was better than Ken Dryden.

The Canadian coaching staff must have debated long and hard about their goaltending situation for game 8. Ultimately they went with the man who was supposed to be the number one guy as Ken Dryden got the nod. Dryden won the game.

 

# 97 Yakushev

The Big Yak, Alexander Yakushev, was the Soviets leading scorer and only trailed Phil Esposito by one point in the overall scoring lead. His 7 goals tied him with Espo and Paul Henderson for the lead. Four times he was named as the Soviet’s game MVP. A giant, stone-faced left winger, Yakushev thrived in the slot and was to Team Russia as Phil Esposito was to Team Canada.

 
# 98 Henderson

 
# 98 HERO
 
What more can be said about Paul Henderson’s heroics that has not been said time and time again?

He scored the game winning goals in game 6, game 7 and of course game 8. And he will be forever immortalized in hockey history as he scored on what is arguably the greatest hockey moment ever.

 

 
# 99 Parise
 

Parise claims his favorite part of the series was being able to play in that historic eighth game where Paul Henderson scored the most famous goal in hockey history. Of course Parise didn’t get to finish that game. He was ejected from the game when he came perilously close to deliberately injuring incompetent referee Josef Kompalla.
He gave me a penalty and I broke my stick on the ice and then faked a swing at him. I never planned to hit him. I just wanted to show him we’d had enough,” said Parise.
 

 
# 100 V. Kharlamov 1948-1981
 
He won 2 Olympic Gold Medals, 8 World Championships with the USSR National team and numerous USSR league championships with Moscow Central Red Army.
Valeri Kharlamov awed Canadian audiences. His slick foot and stick work and amazing speed and shot accuracy places him as perhaps the single most talented player in the entire tournament. It is arguable that Kharlamov was as talented as Gretzky or Lemieux. Kharlamov was
also feisty, leading the Soviets in penalty minutes with 16.

# 101 Checklist

Checklist (unmarked)

And what would this be without the version francaise.

 
Numero 1 Au Commencement
 

Numero 30 Les Freres

Numero 101 Liste des cartes

 
 
 
 40 years ago today. This was the big news in the hockey world. Lockout was when you forgot your keys. Or came home late and slept on the couch. I guess we’ve all done both.

The entire team was inducted into Canada’s Walk of Fame in Toronto last Saturday and will have a gala dinner at Toronto’s Royal York Hotel tonight.

Da da Canada
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